Diclofenac Potassium 50 Mg

Stop taking diclofenac and get medical help right away if you notice any of these rare but serious side effects: stomach/abdominal pain that doesn’t go away, black/tarry stools, vomit that looks like coffee grounds, chest/jaw/left arm pain, shortness of breath, unusual sweating, confusion, weakness on one side of the body, trouble speaking, sudden vision changes.

Diclofenac Potassium Prescribing Information

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Dec 1, 2022.

On This Page
  • Boxed Warning
  • Description
  • Clinical Pharmacology
  • Indications and Usage
  • Contraindications
  • Warnings
  • Precautions
  • Patient Counseling Information
  • Drug Interactions
  • Adverse Reactions/Side Effects
  • Overdosage
  • Dosage and Administration
  • How Supplied/Storage and Handling
  • Medication Guide

WARNING: RISK OF SERIOUS CARDIOVASCULAR AND GASTROINTESTINAL EVENTS

Cardiovascular Thrombotic Events
• Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) cause an increased risk of serious cardiovascular thrombotic events, including myocardial infarction and stroke, which can be fatal. This risk may occur early in treatment and may increase with duration of use. (see WARNINGS).
• Diclofenac Potassium Tablets are contraindicated in the setting of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery (see CONTRAINDICATIONS, WARNINGS).

Gastrointestinal Bleeding, Ulceration, and Perforation
• NSAIDs cause an increased risk of serious gastrointestinal (GI) adverse events including bleeding, ulceration, and perforation of the stomach or intestines, which can be fatal. These events can occur at any time during use and without warning symptoms. Elderly patients and patients with a prior history of peptic ulcer disease and/or GI bleeding are at greater risk for serious GI events. (see WARNINGS).

Diclofenac Potassium Description

Diclofenac Potassium tablets, USP are a benzeneacetic acid derivative. Diclofenac Potassium tablets are available as immediate-release tablets of 50 mg (white to off-white) for oral administration. Diclofenac Potassium, USP is a White to off-white or slightly yellowish crystalline powder, slightly hygroscopic and is freely soluble in methanol; soluble in alcohol; sparingly soluble in water; slightly soluble in acetone. The chemical name is 2-[(2,6-dichlorophenyl)amino] benzeneacetic acid, monopotassium salt. The molecular weight is 334.25. Its molecular formula is C 14 H 10 Cl 2 NKO 2 , and it has the following structural formula.

Diclofenac Potassium 50 Mg

The inactive ingredients in Diclofenac Potassium tablets include: lactose monohydrate, microcrystalline cellulose, sodium lauryl sulphate, colloidal silicon dioxide, magnesium stearate, hypromellose, talc & titanium dioxide.

Diclofenac Potassium – Clinical Pharmacology

Mechanism of Action
Diclofenac has analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic properties.

The mechanism of action of Diclofenac Potassium tablets, like that of other NSAIDs, is not completely understood but involves inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2).

Diclofenac is a potent inhibitor of prostaglandin synthesis in vitro . Diclofenac concentrations reached during therapy have produced in vivo effects. Prostaglandins sensitize afferent nerves and potentiate the action of bradykinin in inducing pain in animal models. Prostaglandins are mediators of inflammation. Because diclofenac is an inhibitor of prostaglandin synthesis, its mode of action may be due to a decrease of prostaglandins in peripheral tissues.

Absorption
Diclofenac is 100% absorbed after oral administration compared to intravenous (IV) administration as measured by urine recovery. However, due to first-pass metabolism, only about 50% of the absorbed dose is systemically available (see Table 1). In some fasting volunteers, measurable plasma levels are observed within 10 minutes of dosing with Diclofenac Potassium tablets. Peak plasma levels are achieved approximately 1 hour in fasting normal volunteers, with a range of 0.33 to 2 hours. Food has no significant effect on the extent of diclofenac absorption. However, there is usually a delay in the onset of absorption and a reduction in peak plasma levels of approximately 30%.

Table 1. Pharmacokinetic Parameters for Diclofenac

PK Parameter Normal Healthy Adults
(20 to 52 years)
Mean Coefficient of
Variation (%)
Absolute Bioavailability (%)
[N = 7]
55 40
T max (hr)
[N = 65]
1.0 76
Oral Clearance (CL/F; mL/min)
[N = 61]
622 21
Renal Clearance (% unchanged drug in urine)
[N = 7]
Apparent Volume of Distribution (V/F; L/kg)
[N = 61]
1.3 33
Terminal Half-life (hr)
[N = 48]
1.9 29

The apparent volume of distribution (V/F) of Diclofenac Potassium is 1.3 L/kg.

Diclofenac is more than 99% bound to human serum proteins, primarily to albumin. Serum protein binding is constant over the concentration range (0.15 to 105 mcg/mL) achieved with recommended doses.

Diclofenac diffuses into and out of the synovial fluid. Diffusion into the joint occurs when plasma levels are higher than those in the synovial fluid, after which the process reverses and synovial fluid levels are higher than plasma levels. It is not known whether diffusion into the joint plays a role in the effectiveness of diclofenac.

Five diclofenac metabolites have been identified in human plasma and urine. The metabolites include 4’hydroxy-, 5-hydroxy-, 3′-hydroxy-, 4′,5-dihydroxy- and 3′-hydroxy-4′-methoxy-diclofenac. The major diclofenac metabolite, 4′-hydroxy-diclofenac, has very weak pharmacologic activity. The formation of 4’-hydroxy-diclofenac is primarily mediated by CYP2C9. Both diclofenac and its oxidative metabolites undergo glucuronidation or sulfation followed by biliary excretion. Acylglucuronidation mediated by UGT2B7 and oxidation mediated by CYP2C8 may also play a role in diclofenac metabolism. CYP3A4 is responsible for the formation of minor metabolites, 5-hydroxy- and 3’-hydroxy-diclofenac. In patients with renal dysfunction, peak concentrations of metabolites 4′-hydroxy- and 5-hydroxy-diclofenac were approximately 50% and 4% of the parent compound after single oral dosing compared to 27% and 1% in normal healthy subjects.

Diclofenac is eliminated through metabolism and subsequent urinary and biliary excretion of the glucuronide and the sulfate conjugates of the metabolites. Little or no free unchanged diclofenac is excreted in the urine. Approximately 65% of the dose is excreted in the urine and approximately 35% in the bile as conjugates of unchanged diclofenac plus metabolites. Because renal elimination is not a significant pathway of elimination for unchanged diclofenac, dosing adjustment in patients with mild to moderate renal dysfunction is not necessary. The terminal half-life of unchanged diclofenac is approximately 2 hours.

Pediatric : The pharmacokinetics of Diclofenac Potassium tablets have not been investigated in pediatric patients.

Race : Pharmacokinetic differences due to race have not been identified.

Hepatic Impairment : Hepatic metabolism accounts for almost 100% of Diclofenac Potassium tablets elimination, so patients with hepatic disease may require reduced doses of Diclofenac Potassium tablets compared to patients with normal hepatic function.

Renal Impairment : Diclofenac pharmacokinetics has been investigated in subjects with renal insufficiency. No differences in the pharmacokinetics of diclofenac have been detected in studies of patients with renal impairment. In patients with renal impairment (inulin clearance 60 to 90, 30 to 60, and less than 30 mL/min; N=6 in each group), AUC values and elimination rate were comparable to those in healthy subjects.

Drug Interactions Studies

Voriconazole : When co-administered with voriconazole (inhibitor of CYP2C9, 2C19 and 3A4 enzyme), the C max and AUC of diclofenac increased by 114% and 78%, respectively (see PRECAUTIONS; Drug Interactions).

Aspirin : When NSAIDs were administered with aspirin, the protein binding of NSAIDs were reduced, although the clearance of free NSAID was not altered. The clinical significance of this interaction is not known. See Table 2 for clinically significant drug interactions of NSAIDs with aspirin (see PRECAUTIONS; Drug Interactions).

Indications and Usage for Diclofenac Potassium

Carefully consider the potential benefits and risks of Diclofenac Potassium immediate-release tablets and other treatment options before deciding to use Diclofenac Potassium tablets. Use the lowest effective dose for the shortest duration consistent with individual patient treatment goals (see WARNINGS; Gastrointestinal Bleeding, Ulceration, and Perforation).

Diclofenac Potassium tablets are indicated:

  • For treatment of primary dysmenorrhea
  • For relief of mild to moderate pain
  • For relief of the signs and symptoms of osteoarthritis
  • For relief of the signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis

Contraindications

Diclofenac Potassium tablets are contraindicated in the following patients:

  • Known hypersensitivity (e.g., anaphylactic reactions and serious skin reactions) to diclofenac or any components of the drug product (see WARNINGS; Anaphylactic Reactions, Serious Skin Reactions).
  • History of asthma, urticaria, or allergic-type reactions after taking aspirin or other NSAIDs. Severe, sometimes fatal, anaphylactic reactions to NSAIDs have been reported in such patients ( see WARNINGS; Anaphylactic Reactions, Exacerbation of Asthma Related to Aspirin Sensitivity).
  • In the setting of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery ( see WARNINGS; Cardiovascular Thrombotic Events).

Warnings

Cardiovascular Thrombotic Events

Clinical trials of several COX-2 selective and nonselective NSAIDs of up to three years duration have shown an increased risk of serious cardiovascular (CV) thrombotic events, including myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke, which can be fatal. Based on available data, it is unclear that the risk for CV thrombotic events is similar for all NSAIDs. The relative increase in serious CV thrombotic events over baseline conferred by NSAID use appears to be similar in those with and without known CV disease or risk factors for CV disease. However, patients with known CV disease or risk factors had a higher absolute incidence of excess serious CV thrombotic events, due to their increased baseline rate. Some observational studies found that this increased risk of serious CV thrombotic events began as early as the first weeks of treatment. The increase in CV thrombotic risk has been observed most consistently at higher doses.

To minimize the potential risk for an adverse CV event in NSAID-treated patients, use the lowest effective dose for the shortest duration possible. Physicians and patients should remain alert for the development of such events, throughout the entire treatment course, even in the absence of previous CV symptoms. Patients should be informed about the symptoms of serious CV events and the steps to take if they occur.

There is no consistent evidence that concurrent use of aspirin mitigates the increased risk of serious CV thrombotic events associated with NSAID use. The concurrent use of aspirin and an NSAID, such as diclofenac, increases the risk of serious gastrointestinal (GI) events (see WARNINGS; Gastrointestinal Bleeding, Ulceration, and Perforation).

Status Post Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG) Surgery
Two large, controlled, clinical trials of a COX-2 selective NSAID for the treatment of pain in the first 10 to 14 days following CABG surgery found an increased incidence of myocardial infarction and stroke. NSAIDs are contraindicated in the setting of CABG (see CONTRAINDICATIONS).

Post-MI Patients
Observational studies conducted in the Danish National Registry have demonstrated that patients treated with NSAIDs in the post-MI period were at increased risk of reinfarction, CV-related death, and all-cause mortality beginning in the first week of treatment. In this same cohort, the incidence of death in the first year post-MI was 20 per 100 person years in NSAID-treated patients compared to 12 per 100 person years in non-NSAID exposed patients. Although the absolute rate of death declined somewhat after the first year post-MI, the increased relative risk of death in NSAID users persisted over at least the next four years of follow-up.

Avoid the use of Diclofenac Potassium tablets in patients with a recent MI unless the benefits are expected to outweigh the risk of recurrent CV thrombotic events. If Diclofenac Potassium tablets are used in patients with a recent MI, monitor patients for signs of cardiac ischemia.

Gastrointestinal Bleeding, Ulceration, and Perforation

NSAIDs, including diclofenac, cause serious gastrointestinal (GI) adverse events including inflammation, bleeding, ulceration, and perforation of the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, or large intestine, which can be fatal. These serious adverse events can occur at any time, with or without warning symptoms, in patients treated with NSAIDs. Only one in five patients, who develop a serious upper GI adverse event on NSAID therapy, is symptomatic. Upper GI ulcers, gross bleeding or perforation caused by NSAIDs occurred in approximately 1% of patients treated for 3 to 6 months, and in about 2% to 4% of patients treated for one year. However, even short-term therapy is not without risk.

Risk Factors for GI Bleeding, Ulceration, and Perforation
Patients with a prior history of peptic ulcer disease and/or GI bleeding who use NSAIDs had a greater than 10-fold increased risk for developing a GI bleed compared to patients without these risk factors. Other factors that increase the risk of GI bleeding in patients treated with NSAIDs include longer duration of NSAID therapy, concomitant use of oral corticosteroids, aspirin, anticoagulants, or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs); smoking, use of alcohol, older age, and poor general health status. Most postmarketing reports of fatal GI events occurred in elderly or debilitated patients. Additionally, patients with advanced liver disease and/or coagulopathy are at increased risk for GI bleeding.

Strategies to Minimize the GI Risks in NSAID-treated patients :

  • Use the lowest effective dosage for the shortest possible duration.
  • Avoid administration of more than one NSAID at a time
  • Avoid use in patients at higher risk unless benefits are expected to outweigh the increased risk of bleeding. For such patients, as well as those with active GI bleeding, consider alternate therapies other than NSAIDs.
  • Remain alert for signs and symptoms of GI ulceration and bleeding during NSAID therapy.
  • If a serious GI adverse event is suspected, promptly initiate evaluation and treatment, and discontinue Diclofenac Potassium tablets until a serious GI adverse event is ruled out.
  • In the setting of concomitant use of low-dose aspirin for cardiac prophylaxis, monitor patients more closely for evidence of GI bleeding (see PRECAUTIONS;Drug Interactions).

Hepatotoxicity
In clinical trials of diclofenac-containing products, meaningful elevations (i.e., more than 3 times the upper limit of normal [ULN] of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) (also known as SGOT) were observed in about 2% of approximately 5,700 patients at some time during diclofenac treatment (alanine aminotransferase [ALT] was not measured in all studies).

In a large, open-label, controlled trial of 3,700 patients treated with oral diclofenac sodium for 2 to 6 months, patients were monitored first at 8 weeks and 1,200 patients were monitored again at 24 weeks. Meaningful elevations of ALT and/or AST occurred in about 4% of patients and included marked elevations (greater than 8 times the ULN) in about 1% of the 3,700 patients. In that open-label study, a higher incidence of borderline (less than 3 times the ULN), moderate (3 to 8 times the ULN), and marked (greater than 8 times the ULN) elevations of ALT or AST was observed in patients receiving diclofenac when compared to other NSAIDs. Elevations in transaminases were seen more frequently in patients with osteoarthritis than in those with rheumatoid arthritis.

Almost all meaningful elevations in transaminases were detected before patients became symptomatic. Abnormal tests occurred during the first 2 months of therapy with diclofenac in 42 of the 51 patients in all trials who developed marked transaminase elevations.

In postmarketing reports, cases of drug-induced hepatotoxicity have been reported in the first month, and in some cases, the first 2 months of therapy, but can occur at any time during treatment with diclofenac. Postmarketing surveillance has reported cases of severe hepatic reactions, including liver necrosis, jaundice, fulminant hepatitis with and without jaundice, and liver failure. Some of these reported cases resulted in fatalities or liver transplantation.

In a European retrospective population-based, case-controlled study, 10 cases of diclofenac associated drug-induced liver injury with current use compared with non-use of diclofenac were associated with a statistically significant 4-fold adjusted odds ratio of liver injury. In this particular study, based on an overall number of 10 cases of liver injury associated with diclofenac, the adjusted odds ratio increased further with female gender, doses of 150 mg or more, and duration of use for more than 90 days.

Physicians should measure transaminases at baseline and periodically in patients receiving long-term therapy with diclofenac, because severe hepatotoxicity may develop without a prodrome of distinguishing symptoms. The optimum times for making the first and subsequent transaminase measurements are not known. Based on clinical trial data and postmarketing experiences, transaminases should be monitored within 4 to 8 weeks after initiating treatment with diclofenac. However, severe hepatic reactions can occur at any time during treatment with diclofenac.

If abnormal liver tests persist or worsen, if clinical signs and/or symptoms consistent with liver disease develop, or if systemic manifestations occur (e.g., eosinophilia, rash, abdominal pain, diarrhea, dark urine, etc.), Diclofenac Potassium tablets should be discontinued immediately.

Inform patients of the warning signs and symptoms of hepatotoxicity (e.g., nausea, fatigue, lethargy, diarrhea, pruritus, jaundice, right upper quadrant tenderness, and “flu-like” symptoms). If clinical signs and symptoms consistent with liver disease develop, or if systemic manifestations occur (e.g., eosinophilia, rash, etc.), discontinue Diclofenac Potassium tablets immediately, and perform a clinical evaluation of the patient.

To minimize the potential risk for an adverse liver related event in patients treated with Diclofenac Potassium tablets, use the lowest effective dose for the shortest duration possible. Exercise caution when prescribing Diclofenac Potassium tablets with concomitant drugs that are known to be potentially hepatotoxic (e.g., acetaminophen, antibiotics, anti-epileptics).

Hypertension
NSAIDs, including Diclofenac Potassium tablets can lead to new onset of hypertension or worsening of preexisting hypertension, either of which may contribute to the increased incidence of CV events. Patients taking angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, thiazides diuretics or loop diuretics may have impaired response to these therapies when taking NSAIDs (see PRECAUTIONS; Drug Interactions).

Monitor blood pressure (BP) during the initiation of NSAID treatment and throughout the course of therapy.

Heart Failure and Edema
The Coxib and traditional NSAID Trialists’ Collaboration meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials demonstrated an approximately two-fold increase in hospitalization for heart failure in COX-2 selective-treated patients and nonselective NSAID-treated patients compared to placebo-treated patients. In a Danish National Registry study of patients with heart failure, NSAID use increased the risk of MI, hospitalization for heart failure, and death.

Additionally, fluid retention and edema have been observed in some patients treated with NSAIDs. Use of diclofenac may blunt the CV effects of several therapeutic agents used to treat these medical conditions (e.g., diuretics, ACE inhibitors, or angiotensin receptor blockers [ARBs]) (see PRECAUTIONS; Drug Interactions).

Avoid the use of Diclofenac Potassium tablets in patients with severe heart failure unless the benefits are expected to outweigh the risk of worsening heart failure. If Diclofenac Potassium tablets are used in patients with severe heart failure, monitor patients for signs of worsening heart failure.

Renal Toxicity and Hyperkalemia
Renal Toxicity
Long-term administration of NSAIDs has resulted in renal papillary necrosis and other renal injury.

Renal toxicity has also been seen in patients in whom renal prostaglandins have a compensatory role in the maintenance of renal perfusion. In these patients, administration of an NSAID may cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation and, secondarily, in renal blood flow, which may precipitate overt renal decompensation. Patients at greatest risk of this reaction are those with impaired renal function, dehydration, hypovolemia, heart failure, liver dysfunction, those taking diuretics and ACE inhibitors or ARBs, and the elderly. Discontinuation of NSAID therapy is usually followed by recovery to the pretreatment state.

No information is available from controlled clinical studies regarding the use of Diclofenac Potassium tablets in patients with advanced renal disease. The renal effects of Diclofenac Potassium tablets may hasten the progression of renal dysfunction in patients with preexisting renal disease.

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Correct volume status in dehydrated or hypovolemic patients prior to initiating Diclofenac Potassium tablets. Monitor renal function in patients with renal or hepatic impairment, heart failure, dehydration, or hypovolemia during use of Diclofenac Potassium tablets (see PRECAUTIONS; Drug Interactions). Avoid the use of Diclofenac Potassium tablets in patients with advanced renal disease unless the benefits are expected to outweigh the risk of worsening renal function. If Diclofenac Potassium tablets are used in patients with advanced renal disease, monitor patients for signs of worsening renal function.

Hyperkalemia
Increases in serum potassium concentration, including hyperkalemia, have been reported with use of NSAIDs, even in some patients without renal impairment. In patients with normal renal function, these effects have been attributed to a hyporeninemic-hypoaldosteronism state.

Anaphylactic Reactions
Diclofenac has been associated with anaphylactic reactions in patients with and without known hypersensitivity to diclofenac and in patients with aspirin-sensitive asthma (see CONTRAINDICATIONS, WARNINGS; Exacerbation of Asthma Related to Aspirin Sensitivity).

Exacerbation of Asthma Related to Aspirin Sensitivity
A subpopulation of patients with asthma may have aspirin-sensitive asthma which may include chronic rhinosinusitis complicated by nasal polyps; severe, potentially fatal bronchospasm; and/or intolerance to aspirin and other NSAIDs. Because cross-reactivity between aspirin and other NSAIDs has been reported in such aspirin-sensitive patients, Diclofenac Potassium tablets are contraindicated in patients with this form of aspirin sensitivity (see CONTRAINDICATIONS). When Diclofenac Potassium tablets are used in patients with preexisting asthma (without known aspirin sensitivity), monitor patients for changes in the signs and symptoms of asthma.

Serious Skin Reactions
NSAIDs, including diclofenac, can cause serious skin adverse events such as exfoliative dermatitis, Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS), and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), which can be fatal. These serious events may occur without warning. Inform patients about the signs and symptoms of serious skin reactions and discontinue the use of Diclofenac Potassium tablets at the first appearance of skin rash or any other sign of hypersensitivity. Diclofenac Potassium tablets are contraindicated in patients with previous serious skin reactions to NSAIDs (see CONTRAINDICATIONS).

Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS)

Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS) has been reported in patients taking NSAIDs, such as Diclofenac Potassium tablets. Some of these events have been fatal or life-threatening. DRESS typically, although not exclusively, presents with fever, rash, lymphadenopathy, and/or facial swelling. Other clinical manifestations may include hepatitis, nephritis, hematological abnormalities, myocarditis, or myositis. Sometimes symptoms of DRESS may resemble an acute viral infection. Eosinophilia is often present. Because this disorder is variable in its presentation, other organ systems not noted here may be involved. It is important to note that early manifestations of hypersensitivity, such as fever or lymphadenopathy, may be present even though rash is not evident. If such signs or symptoms are present, discontinue Diclofenac Potassium tablets and evaluate the patient immediately.

Premature Closure of Fetal Ductus Arteriosus

Avoid use of NSAIDs, including Diclofenac Potassium tablets, in pregnant women at about 30 weeks’ gestation and later. NSAIDs, including Diclofenac Potassium tablets, increase the risk of premature closure of the fetal ductus arteriosus at approximately this gestational age.

Oligohydramnios/Neonatal Renal Impairment

Use of NSAIDs, including Diclofenac Potassium tablets, at about 20 weeks gestation or later in pregnancy may cause fetal renal dysfunction leading to oligohydramnios and, in some cases, neonatal renal impairment. These adverse outcomes are seen, on average, after days to weeks of treatment, although oligohydramnios has been infrequently reported as soon as 48 hours after NSAID initiation. Oligohydramnios is often, but not always, reversible with treatment discontinuation. Complications of prolonged oligohydramnios may, for example, include limb contractures and delayed lung maturation. In some postmarketing cases of impaired neonatal renal function, invasive procedures, such as exchange transfusion or dialysis were required.

If NSAID treatment is necessary between about 20 weeks and 30 weeks gestation, limit Diclofenac Potassium tablets use to the lowest effective dose and shortest duration possible. Consider ultrasound monitoring of amniotic fluid if Diclofenac Potassium tablets treatment extends beyond 48 hours. Discontinue Diclofenac Potassium tablets if oligohydramnios occurs and follow up according to clinical practice (see PRECAUTIONS; Pregnancy).

Hematologic Toxicity
Anemia has occurred in NSAID-treated patients. This may be due to occult or gross blood loss, fluid retention, or an incompletely described effect upon erythropoiesis. If a patient treated with Diclofenac Potassium tablets have any signs or symptoms of anemia, monitor hemoglobin or hematocrit.

NSAIDs, including Diclofenac Potassium tablets, may increase the risk of bleeding events. Co-morbid conditions such as coagulation disorders, concomitant use of warfarin and other anticoagulants, antiplatelet agents (e.g., aspirin), serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) may increase this risk. Monitor these patients for signs of bleeding (see PRECAUTIONS; Drug Interactions).

Precautions

General

Diclofenac Potassium immediate-release tablets cannot be expected to substitute for corticosteroids or to treat corticosteroid insufficiency. Abrupt discontinuation of corticosteroids may lead to disease exacerbation. Patients on prolonged corticosteroid therapy should have their therapy tapered slowly if a decision is made to discontinue corticosteroids and the patient should be observed closely for any evidence of adverse effects, including adrenal insufficiency and exacerbation of symptoms of arthritis.

The pharmacological activity of Diclofenac Potassium tablets in reducing fever and inflammation may diminish the utility of these diagnostic signs in detecting complications of presumed noninfectious, painful conditions.

Information for Patients

Advise the patient to read the FDA-approved patient labeling (Medication Guide) that accompanies each prescription dispensed. Inform patients, families, or their caregivers of the following information before initiating therapy with Diclofenac Potassium tablets and periodically during the course of ongoing therapy.

Cardiovascular Thrombotic Events
Advise patients to be alert for the symptoms of cardiovascular thrombotic events, including chest pain, shortness of breath, weakness, or slurring of speech, and to report any of these symptoms to their healthcare provider immediately (see WARNINGS; Cardiovascular Thrombotic Events).

Gastrointestinal Bleeding, Ulceration, and Perforation
Advise patients to report symptoms of ulcerations and bleeding, including epigastric pain, dyspepsia, melena, and hematemesis to their health care provider. In the setting of concomitant use of low-dose aspirin for cardiac prophylaxis, inform patients of the increased risk for the signs and symptoms of GI bleeding (see WARNINGS; Gastrointestinal Bleeding, Ulceration, and Perforation).

Hepatotoxicity
Inform patients of the warning signs and symptoms of hepatotoxicity (eg, nausea, fatigue, lethargy, pruritus, diarrhea, jaundice, right upper quadrant tenderness, and “flu-like” symptoms). If these occur, instruct patients to stop Diclofenac Potassium tablets and seek immediate medical therapy (see WARNINGS; Hepatotoxicity).

Heart Failure and Edema
Advise patients to be alert for the symptoms of congestive heart failure including shortness of breath, unexplained weight gain, or edema and to contact their healthcare provider if such symptoms occur (see WARNINGS; Heart Failure and Edema).

Anaphylactic Reactions
Inform patients of the signs of an anaphylactic reaction (eg, difficulty breathing, swelling of the face or throat). Instruct patients to seek immediate emergency help if these occur (see WARNINGS; Anaphylactic Reactions).

Serious Skin Reactions , Including DRESS
Advise patients to stop Diclofenac Potassium tablets immediately if they develop any type of rash or fever and contact their healthcare provider as soon as possible (see WARNINGS; Serious Skin Reactions).

Female Fertility
Advise females of reproductive potential who desire pregnancy that NSAIDs, including Diclofenac Potassium tablets, may be associated with a reversible delay in ovulation (see PRECAUTIONS; Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility).

Fetal Toxicity
Inform pregnant women to avoid use of Diclofenac Potassium tablets and other NSAIDs, starting at 30 weeks gestation because of the risk of the premature closure of the fetal ductus arteriosus. If treatment with Diclofenac Potassium tablets is needed for a pregnant woman between about 20 to 30 weeks gestation, advise her that she may need to be monitored for oligohydramnios, if treatment continues for longer than 48 hours (see WARNINGS; Fetal Toxicity, PRECAUTIONS, Pregnancy).

Avoid Concomitant Use of NSAIDs
Inform patients that the concomitant use of Diclofenac Potassium tablets with other NSAIDs or salicylates (e.g., diflunisal, salsalate) is not recommended due to the increased risk of gastrointestinal toxicity, and little or no increase in efficacy (see WARNINGS; Gastrointestinal Bleeding, Ulceration, and Perforation and Drug Interactions). Alert patients that NSAIDs may be present in “over the counter” medications for treatment of colds, fever, or insomnia.

Use of NSAIDS and Low-Dose Aspirin
Inform patients not to use low-dose aspirin concomitantly with Diclofenac Potassium tablets until they talk to their healthcare provider (see PRECAUTIONS; Drug Interactions).

Masking of Inflammation and Fever
The pharmacological activity of Diclofenac Potassium tablets in reducing fever and inflammation, and possibly fever, may diminish the utility of these diagnostic signs in detecting infections.

Laboratory Monitoring
Because serious GI bleeding, hepatotoxicity, and renal injury can occur without warning symptoms or signs, consider monitoring patients on long-term NSAID treatment with a CBC and a chemistry profile periodically (see WARNINGS; Gastrointestinal Bleeding, Ulceration and Perforation, and Hepatotoxicity).

Drug Interactions

See Table 2 for clinically significant drug interactions with diclofenac.

Table 2: Clinically Significant Drug Interactions with Diclofenac

  • Diclofenac and anticoagulants such as warfarin have a synergistic effect on bleeding. The concomitant use of diclofenac and anticoagulants have an increased risk of serious bleeding compared to the use of either drug alone.
  • Serotonin release by platelets plays an important role in hemostasis. Case-control and cohort epidemiological studies showed that concomitant use of drugs that interfere with serotonin reuptake and an NSAID may potentiate the risk of bleeding more than an NSAID alone.
  • NSAIDs may diminish the antihypertensive effect of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), or beta-blockers (including propranolol).
  • In patients who are elderly, volume-depleted (including those on diuretic therapy), or have renal impairment, co-administration of an NSAID with ACE inhibitors or ARBs may result in deterioration of renal function, including possible acute renal failure. These effects are usually reversible.
  • During concomitant use of Diclofenac Potassium tablets and ACE-inhibitors, ARBs, or beta-blockers, monitor blood pressure to ensure that the desired blood pressure is obtained.
  • During concomitant use of Diclofenac Potassium tablets and ACE-inhibitors or ARBs in patients who are elderly, volume-depleted, or have impaired renal function, monitor for signs of worsening renal function (see WARNINGS; Renal Toxicity and Hyperkalemia).
  • When these drugs are administered concomitantly, patients should be adequately hydrated. Assess renal function at the beginning of the concomitant treatment and periodically thereafter.

NSAIDs with short elimination half-lives (e.g., diclofenac, indomethacin) should be avoided for a period of two days before, the day of, and two days following administration of pemetrexed.

Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility

Carcinogenesis
Long-term carcinogenicity studies in rats given diclofenac sodium up to 2 mg/kg/day (approximately 0.1 times the maximum recommended human dose (MRHD) of Diclofenac Potassium tablets, 200 mg/day, based on body surface area (BSA) comparison) have revealed no significant increase in tumor incidence. A 2-year carcinogenicity study conducted in mice employing diclofenac sodium at doses up to 0.3 mg/kg/day (approximately 0.007 times the MRHD based on BSA comparison) in males and 1 mg/kg/day (approximately 0.02 times the MRHD based on BSA comparison) in females did not reveal any oncogenic potential.

Mutagenesis
Diclofenac sodium did not show mutagenic activity in in vitro point mutation assays in mammalian (mouse lymphoma) and microbial (yeast, Ames) test systems and was nonmutagenic in several mammalian in vitro and in vivo tests, including dominant lethal and male germinal epithelial chromosomal studies in mice, and nucleus anomaly and chromosomal aberration studies in Chinese hamsters.

Impairment of Fertility
Diclofenac sodium administered to male and female rats at 4 mg/kg/day (approximately 0.2 times the MRHD based on BSA comparison) did not affect fertility.

Based on the mechanism of action, the use of prostaglandin-mediated NSAIDs, including Diclofenac Potassium tablets, may delay or prevent rupture of ovarian follicles, which has been associated with reversible infertility in some women. Published animal studies have shown that administration of prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors has the potential to disrupt prostaglandin-mediated follicular rupture required for ovulation. Small studies in women treated with NSAIDs have also shown a reversible delay in ovulation. Consider withdrawal of NSAIDs, including Diclofenac Potassium tablets, in women who have difficulties conceiving or who are undergoing investigation of infertility.

Pregnancy

Risk Summary
Use of NSAIDs, including Diclofenac Potassium tablets can cause premature closure of the fetal ductus arteriosus and fetal renal dysfunction leading to oligohydramnios and, in some cases, neonatal renal impairment. Because of these risks, limit dose and duration of Diclofenac Potassium tablets use between about 20 and 30 weeks of gestation, and avoid Diclofenac Potassium tablets use at about 30 weeks of gestation and later in pregnancy (see WARNINGS; Fetal Toxicity).

Premature Closure of Fetal Ductus Arteriosus
Use of NSAIDs, including Diclofenac Potassium tablets, at about 30 weeks gestation or later in pregnancy increases the risk of premature closure of the fetal ductus arteriosus.

Oligohydramnios/Neonatal Renal Impairment
Use of NSAIDs at about 20 weeks gestation or later in pregnancy has been associated with cases of fetal renal dysfunction leading to oligohydramnios, and in some cases, neonatal renal impairment.
There are no adequate and well-controlled studies of Diclofenac Potassium tablets in pregnant women.

Data from observational studies regarding potential embryofetal risks of NSAID use in women in the first or second trimesters of pregnancy are inconclusive. In animal reproduction studies, no evidence of teratogenicity was observed in mice, rats, or rabbits given diclofenac during the period of organogenesis at doses up to approximately 0.5, 0.5, and 1 times, respectively, the maximum recommended human dose (MRHD) of Diclofenac Potassium tablets, despite the presence of maternal and fetal toxicity at these doses ( see Data ).

Based on published animal data, prostaglandins have been shown to have an important role in endometrial vascular permeability, blastocyst implantation, and decidualization. In animal studies, administration of prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors, such as diclofenac, resulted in increased pre-and postimplantation loss. Prostaglandins also have been shown to have an important role in fetal kidney development. In published animal studies, prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors have been reported to impair kidney development when administered at clinically relevant doses.

The estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated population(s) is unknown. All pregnancies have a background risk of birth defect, loss, or other adverse outcomes. In the U.S. general population, the estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies is 2% to 4% and 15% to 20%, respectively.

Fetal/Neonatal Adverse Reactions

Premature Closure of Fetal Ductus Arteriosus:

Avoid use of NSAIDs in women at about 30 weeks gestation and later in pregnancy, because NSAIDs, including Diclofenac Potassium tablets, can cause premature closure of the fetal ductus arteriosus (see WARNINGS; Fetal Toxicity).

Oligohydramnios/Neonatal Renal Impairment:

If an NSAID is necessary at about 20 weeks gestation or later in pregnancy, limit the use to the lowest effective dose and shortest duration possible. If Diclofenac Potassium tablets treatment extends beyond 48 hours, consider monitoring with ultrasound for oligohydramnios. If oligohydramnios occurs, discontinue Diclofenac Potassium tablets and follow up according to clinical practice (see WARNINGS; Fetal Toxicity).

Data

Premature Closure of Fetal Ductus Arteriosus:

Published literature reports that the use of NSAIDs at about 30 weeks of gestation and later in pregnancy may cause premature closure of the fetal ductus arteriosus.

Oligohydramnios/Neonatal Renal Impairment:

Published studies and postmarketing reports describe maternal NSAID use at about 20 weeks gestation or later in pregnancy associated with fetal renal dysfunction leading to oligohydramnios, and in some cases, neonatal renal impairment. These adverse outcomes are seen, on average, after days to weeks of treatment, although oligohydramnios has been infrequently reported as soon as 48 hours after NSAID initiation. In many cases, but not all, the decrease in amniotic fluid was transient and reversible with cessation of the drug. There have been a limited number of case reports of maternal NSAID use and neonatal renal dysfunction without oligohydramnios, some of which were irreversible. Some cases of neonatal renal dysfunction required treatment with invasive procedures, such as exchange transfusion or dialysis.

Methodological limitations of these postmarketing studies and reports include lack of a control group; limited information regarding dose, duration, and timing of drug exposure; and concomitant use of other medications. These limitations preclude establishing a reliable estimate of the risk of adverse fetal and neonatal outcomes with maternal NSAID use. Because the published safety data on neonatal outcomes involved mostly preterm infants, the generalizability of certain reported risks to the full-term infant exposed to NSAIDs through maternal use is uncertain.

Animal Data
Reproductive and developmental studies in animals demonstrated that diclofenac sodium administration during organogenesis did not produce teratogenicity despite the induction of maternal toxicity and fetal toxicity in mice at oral doses up to 20 mg/kg/day (approximately 0.5 times the maximum recommended human dose [MRHD] of Diclofenac Potassium tablets, 200 mg/day, based on body surface area (BSA) comparison), and in rats and rabbits at oral doses up to 10 mg/kg/day (approximately 0.5 and 1 times, respectively, the MRHD based on BSA comparison). In a study in which pregnant rats were orally administered 2 or 4 mg/kg diclofenac (0.1 and 0.2 times the MRHD based on BSA) from Gestation Day 15 through Lactation Day 21, significant maternal toxicity (peritonitis, mortality) was noted. These maternally toxic doses were associated with dystocia, prolonged gestation, reduced fetal weights and growth, and reduced fetal survival. Diclofenac has been shown to cross the placental barrier in mice, rats, and humans.

Labor or Delivery

There are no studies on the effects of Diclofenac Potassium tablets during labor or delivery. In animal studies, NSAIDS, including diclofenac, inhibit prostaglandin synthesis, cause delayed parturition, and increase the incidence of stillbirth.

Nursing Mothers

Risk Summary
Based on available data, diclofenac may be present in human milk. The developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding should be considered along with the mother’s clinical need for Diclofenac Potassium tablets and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed infant from the Diclofenac Potassium tablets or from the underlying maternal condition.

Data
One woman treated orally with a diclofenac salt, 150 mg/day, had a milk diclofenac level of 100 mcg/L, equivalent to an infant dose of about 0.03 mg/kg/day. Diclofenac was not detectable in breast milk in 12 women using diclofenac (after either 100 mg/day orally for 7 days or a single 50 mg intramuscular dose administered in the immediate postpartum period).

Pediatric Use

Safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients have not been established.

Geriatric Use

Elderly patients, compared to younger patients, are at greater risk for NSAID-associated serious cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and/or renal adverse reactions, If the anticipated benefit for the elderly patient outweighs these potential risks, start dosing at the low end of the dosing range, and monitor patients for adverse effects (see WARNINGS; Cardiovascular Thrombotic Events, Gastrointestinal Bleeding, Ulceration, and Perforation, Hepatotoxicity, Renal Toxicity and Hyperkalemia, PRECAUTIONS; Laboratory Monitoring).

Diclofenac is known to be substantially excreted by the kidney, and the risk of adverse reactions to this drug may be greater in patients with impaired renal function. Because elderly patients are more likely to have decreased renal function, care should be taken in dose selection, and it may be useful to monitor renal function (See CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY, ADVERSE REACTIONS).

See also  What Is Brown Noise

Adverse Reactions

The following adverse reactions are discussed in greater detail in other sections of the labeling:

  • Cardiovascular Thrombotic Events (see WARNINGS)
  • GI Bleeding, Ulceration and Perforation (see WARNINGS)
  • Hepatotoxicity (see WARNINGS)
  • Hypertension (see WARNINGS)
  • Heart Failure and Edema (see WARNINGS)
  • Renal Toxicity and Hyperkalemia (see WARNINGS)
  • Anaphylactic Reactions (see WARNINGS)
  • Serious Skin Reactions (see WARNINGS)
  • Hematologic Toxicity (see WARNINGS)

Clinical Trials Experience

Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.

In 718 patients treated for shorter periods, i.e., 2 weeks or less, with Diclofenac Potassium immediate-release tablets, adverse reactions were reported one-half to one-tenth as frequently as by patients treated for longer periods. In a 6-month, double-blind trial comparing Diclofenac Potassium tablets (N=196) versus VOLTRAREN (N=197) versus ibuprofen (N=197), adverse reactions were similar in nature and frequency.

In patients taking Diclofenac Potassium tablets or other NSAIDs, the most frequently reported adverse experiences occurring in approximately 1% to 10% of patients are:

Gastrointestinal experiences including: abdominal pain, constipation, diarrhea, dyspepsia, flatulence, gross bleeding/perforation, heartburn, nausea, GI ulcers (gastric/duodenal) and vomiting.

Abnormal renal function, anemia, dizziness, edema, elevated liver enzymes, headaches, increased bleeding time, pruritus, rashes and tinnitus.

Additional adverse experiences reported occasionally include:

Body as a Whole: fever, infection, sepsis

Cardiovascular System: congestive heart failure, hypertension, tachycardia, syncope

Digestive System: dry mouth, esophagitis, gastric/peptic ulcers, gastritis, gastrointestinal bleeding, glossitis, hematemesis, hepatitis, jaundice

Hemic and Lymphatic System: ecchymosis, eosinophilia, leukopenia, melena, purpura, rectal bleeding, stomatitis, thrombocytopenia

Metabolic and Nutritional: weight changes

Nervous System: anxiety, asthenia, confusion, depression, dream abnormalities, drowsiness, insomnia, malaise, nervousness, paresthesia, somnolence, tremors, vertigo
Respiratory System: asthma, dyspnea

Skin and Appendages: alopecia, photosensitivity, sweating increased

Special Senses: blurred vision

Urogenital System: cystitis, dysuria, hematuria, interstitial nephritis, oliguria/polyuria, proteinuria, renal failure

Other adverse reactions, which occur rarely are:

Body as a Whole: anaphylactic reactions, appetite changes, death

Cardiovascular System: arrhythmia, hypotension, myocardial infarction, palpitations, vasculitis

Digestive System: colitis, eructation, fulminant hepatitis with and without jaundice, liver failure, liver necrosis, pancreatitis

Hemic and Lymphatic System: agranulocytosis, hemolytic anemia, aplastic anemia, lymphadenopathy, pancytopenia

Metabolic and Nutritional: hyperglycemia

Nervous System: convulsions, coma, hallucinations, meningitis

Respiratory System: respiratory depression, pneumonia

Skin and Appendages: angioedema, toxic epidermal necrolysis, erythema multiforme, exfoliative dermatitis, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, urticaria

Special Senses: conjunctivitis, hearing impairment

Overdosage

Symptoms following acute NSAID overdosages have been typically limited to lethargy, drowsiness, nausea, vomiting, and epigastric pain, which have been generally reversible with supportive care. Gastrointestinal bleeding has occurred. Hypertension, acute renal failure, respiratory depression and coma have occurred, but were rare. (see WARNINGS; Cardiovascular Thrombotic Events, Gastrointestinal Bleeding, Ulceration, and Perforation, Hypertension, Renal Toxicity and Hyperkalemia).

Manage patients with symptomatic and supportive care following an NSAID overdosage. There are no specific antidotes. Consider emesis and/or activated charcoal (60 to 100 grams in adults, 1 to 2 grams per kg of body weight in pediatric patients) and/or osmotic cathartic in symptomatic patients seen within four hours of ingestion in patients with a large overdose (5 to 10 times the recommended dosage). Forced diuresis, alkalinization of urine, hemodialysis, or hemoperfusion may not be useful due to high protein binding.

For additional information about overdosage treatment, contact a poison control center (1-800-222-1222).

DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

Carefully consider the potential benefits and risks of Diclofenac Potassium immediate-release tablets and other treatment options before deciding to use Diclofenac Potassium tablets. Use the lowest effective dose for the shortest duration consistent with individual patient treatment goals (see WARNINGS; Gastrointestinal Bleeding, Ulceration, and Perforation).

After observing the response to initial therapy with Diclofenac Potassium tablets, the dose and frequency should be adjusted to suit an individual patient’s needs.

For treatment of pain or primary dysmenorrhea the recommended dosage is 50 mg three times a day. With experience, physicians may find that in some patients an initial dose of 100 mg of Diclofenac Potassium tablets, followed by 50-mg doses, will provide better relief.

For the relief of osteoarthritis the recommended dosage is 100 to 150 mg/day in divided doses, 50 mg twice a day. or three times a day.

For the relief of rheumatoid arthritis the recommended dosage is 150 to 200 mg/day in divided doses, 50 mg three times a day or four times a day.

Different formulations of diclofenac [VOLTAREN ® (diclofenac sodium enteric-coated tablets); Voltaren ® -XR (diclofenac sodium extended-release tablets); Diclofenac Potassium immediate release tablets] are not necessarily bioequivalent even if the milligram strength is the same.

How is Diclofenac Potassium Supplied

Diclofenac Potassium Tablets, USP are available containing 50 mg of Diclofenac Potassium, USP.

The 50 mg tablets are white to off-white, round, biconvex, film coated tablets debossed with ‘DP’ on one side and ’50’ on other side.

NDC 70710-1832-1 in HDPE Bottle of 100 tablets with child-resistant closure
NDC 70710-1832-0 in HDPE Bottle of 1000 tablets

Store and dispense in tight, light- resistant container as defined in the USP.

Store at room temperature 20°C to 25°C (68°F to 77°F); excursions permitted between 15°C to 30°C (59°F to 86°F) [see USP Controlled Room Temperature]. Protect from moisture

Medication Guide available at www.zydususa.com/medguides or call 1-877-993-8779.

Manufactured by:
Umedica Laboratories Pvt. Ltd.
Plot No. 221, II nd Phase, GIDC, Vapi – 396 195,
Gujarat, INDIA.

Distributed by:
Zydus Pharmaceuticals (USA) Inc.
Pennington, NJ 08534

  • Increased risk of a heart attack or stroke that can lead to death. This risk may happen early in treatment and may increase:
    • with increasing doses of NSAIDs
    • with longer use of NSAIDs
    • Increased risk of bleeding, ulcers, and tears (perforation) of the esophagus (tube leading from the mouth to the stomach), stomach and intestines:
      • any time during use
      • without warning symptoms
      • that may cause death
      • past history of stomach ulcers, or stomach or intestinal bleeding with use of NSAIDs
      • taking medicines called “corticosteroids”, “anticoagulants”, “SSRIs”, or “SNRIs”
      • increasing doses of NSAIDs
      • longer use of NSAIDs
      • smoking
      • drinking alcohol
      • older age,
      • poor health
      • advanced liver disease
      • bleeding problems
      • exactly as prescribed
      • at the lowest dose possible for your treatment
      • for the shortest time needed
      • if you had an asthma attack, hives, or other allergic reaction with aspirin or any other NSAIDs.
      • right before or after heart bypass surgery.
      • have liver or kidney problems
      • have high blood pressure
      • have asthma
      • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Taking NSAIDs at about 20 weeks of Pregnancy or later may harm your unborn baby. If you need to take NSAIDs for more than 2 days when you are between 20 and 30 weeks of pregnancy, your healthcare provider may need to monitor the amount of fluid in your womb around your baby. You should not take NSAIDs after about 30 weeks of pregnancy.
      • are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed.
      • new or worse high blood pressure
      • heart failure
      • liver problems including liver failure
      • kidney problems including kidney failure
      • low red blood cells (anemia)
      • life-threatening skin reactions
      • life-threatening allergic reactions
      • Other side effects of NSAIDs include: stomach pain, constipation, diarrhea, gas, heartburn, nausea, vomiting, dizziness.
      • shortness of breath or trouble breathing
      • chest pain
      • weakness in one part or side of your body
      • slurred speech
      • swelling of the face or throat
      • nausea
      • more tired or weaker than usual
      • diarrhea
      • itching
      • your skin or eyes look yellow
      • indigestion or stomach pain
      • flu-like symptoms
      • vomit blood
      • there is blood in your bowel movement or it is black and sticky like tar
      • unusual weight gain
      • skin rash or blisters with fever
      • swelling of the arms and legs, hands and feet

      These are not all the possible side effects of NSAIDs. For more information, ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist about NSAIDs.

      • Aspirin is an NSAID medicine but it does not increase the chance of a heart attack. Aspirin can cause bleeding in the brain, stomach, and intestines. Aspirin can also cause ulcers in the stomach and intestines.
      • Some NSAIDs are sold in lower doses without a prescription (over-the-counter). Talk to your healthcare provider before using over-the-counter NSAIDs for more than 10 days.

      Medication Guide available at www.zydususa.com/medguides or call 1-877-993-8779.

      Umedica Laboratories Pvt. Ltd.

      Plot No. 221, II nd Phase, GIDC, Vapi – 396 195,

      Zydus Pharmaceuticals (USA) Inc.

      Pennington, NJ 08534

      This Medication Guide has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

      PACKAGE LABEL.PRINCIPAL DISPLAY PANEL

      HDPE Bottle of 100 Tablets

      Diclofenac Potassium 50 Mg

      HDPE Bottle of 1000 Tablets

      Diclofenac Potassium 50 Mg

      Product Information
      Product Type HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG LABEL Item Code (Source) NDC:70710-1832
      Route of Administration ORAL DEA Schedule
      Active Ingredient/Active Moiety
      Ingredient Name Basis of Strength Strength
      Diclofenac Potassium (DICLOFENAC) Diclofenac Potassium 50 mg
      Inactive Ingredients
      Ingredient Name Strength
      LACTOSE MONOHYDRATE
      CELLULOSE, MICROCRYSTALLINE
      SODIUM LAURYL SULFATE
      SILICON DIOXIDE
      MAGNESIUM STEARATE
      HYPROMELLOSES
      TALC
      TITANIUM DIOXIDE
      Product Characteristics
      Color white (White to off-white) Score no score
      Shape ROUND Size 8mm
      Flavor Imprint Code DP;50
      Contains
      Packaging
      # Item Code Package Description
      1 NDC:70710-1832-1 100 TABLET, FILM COATED in 1 BOTTLE
      2 NDC:70710-1832-0 1000 TABLET, FILM COATED in 1 BOTTLE
      Marketing Information
      Marketing Category Application Number or Monograph Citation Marketing Start Date Marketing End Date
      ANDA ANDA215750 05/12/2022
      Labeler – Zydus Pharmaceuticals (USA) Inc. (156861945)
      Establishment
      Name Address ID/FEI Operations
      UMEDICA LABORATORIES PRIVATE LIMITED 920635096 manufacture(70710-1832), analysis(70710-1832)

      Zydus Pharmaceuticals (USA) Inc.

      Frequently asked questions

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      Diclofenac Potassium – Uses, Side Effects, and More

      Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (including diclofenac) may rarely increase the risk of a heart attack or stroke. This effect can happen at any time while taking this drug but is more likely if you take it for a long time. The risk may be greater in older adults or if you have heart disease or increased risk for heart disease (for example, due to smoking, family history of heart disease, or conditions such as high blood pressure or diabetes). Do not take this drug right before or after heart bypass surgery (CABG).

      Also, this drug may rarely cause serious (rarely fatal) bleeding from the stomach or intestines. This effect can occur without warning symptoms at any time while taking this drug. Older adults may be at higher risk for this effect.

      Stop taking diclofenac and get medical help right away if you notice any of these rare but serious side effects: stomach/abdominal pain that doesn’t go away, black/tarry stools, vomit that looks like coffee grounds, chest/jaw/left arm pain, shortness of breath, unusual sweating, confusion, weakness on one side of the body, trouble speaking, sudden vision changes.

      Talk to your doctor or pharmacist about the benefits and risks of taking this drug.

      Warnings:

      Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (including diclofenac) may rarely increase the risk of a heart attack or stroke. This effect can happen at any time while taking this drug but is more likely if you take it for a long time. The risk may be greater in older adults or if you have heart disease or increased risk for heart disease (for example, due to smoking, family history of heart disease, or conditions such as high blood pressure or diabetes). Do not take this drug right before or after heart bypass surgery (CABG).

      Also, this drug may rarely cause serious (rarely fatal) bleeding from the stomach or intestines. This effect can occur without warning symptoms at any time while taking this drug. Older adults may be at higher risk for this effect.

      Stop taking diclofenac and get medical help right away if you notice any of these rare but serious side effects: stomach/abdominal pain that doesn’t go away, black/tarry stools, vomit that looks like coffee grounds, chest/jaw/left arm pain, shortness of breath, unusual sweating, confusion, weakness on one side of the body, trouble speaking, sudden vision changes.

      Talk to your doctor or pharmacist about the benefits and risks of taking this drug.

      Uses

      See also Warning section.Diclofenac is used to relieve mild to moderate pain and swelling (inflammation) from various conditions such as headache, dental pain, menstrual cramps, and muscle aches. Some brands of this medication may also reduce pain, swelling, and joint stiffness from arthritis. Reducing these symptoms helps you do more of your normal daily activities.Diclofenac is known as a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). It works by blocking your body’s production of certain natural substances that cause inflammation. This effect helps to decrease swelling, pain, or fever.If you are treating a chronic condition such as arthritis, ask your doctor about non-drug treatments and/or using other medications to treat your pain.

      How to use diclofenac potassium oral

      Read the Medication Guide provided by your pharmacist before you start taking diclofenac and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

      Take this medication by mouth as directed by your doctor, usually 2-4 times a day. Take this medication with a full glass of water (8 ounces/240 milliliters) unless your doctor directs you otherwise. Do not lie down for at least 10 minutes after taking this medication. If stomach upset occurs while taking this medication, take it with food, milk, or an antacid.

      There are different brands and forms of this medication available. Because different forms do not have the same effects at equal strengths, do not switch forms of diclofenac unless your doctor tells you to.

      The dosage is based on your medical condition, response to treatment, and other medications you may be taking. To reduce your risk of stomach bleeding and other side effects, take this medication at the lowest effective dose for the shortest possible time. Do not increase your dose or take this drug more often or for longer than prescribed. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor or pharmacist.

      For certain conditions (such as arthritis), it may take up to 2 weeks of taking this drug regularly until you get the full benefit.

      If you are taking this drug “as needed” (not on a regular schedule), remember that pain medications work best if they are used as the first signs of pain occur. If you wait until the pain has worsened, the medicine may not work as well.

      Tell your doctor if your condition gets worse.

      Side Effects

      See also Warning section.

      Upset stomach, nausea, heartburn, diarrhea, constipation, gas, headache, drowsiness, dizziness, or blurred vision may occur. If any of these effects last or get worse, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

      Remember that this medication has been prescribed because your doctor has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

      This medication may raise your blood pressure. Check your blood pressure regularly and tell your doctor if the results are high.

      Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: hearing changes (such as ringing in the ears), mental/mood changes, easy bleeding/bruising, difficult/painful swallowing, symptoms of heart failure (such as swelling ankles/feet, unusual tiredness, unusual/sudden weight gain).

      Get medical help right away if you have any very serious side effects, including: signs of kidney problems (such as change in the amount of urine, pink/bloody urine), unexplained stiff neck.

      Diclofenac may rarely cause serious (possibly fatal) liver disease. Get medical help right away if you have any symptoms of liver damage, including: nausea/vomiting that doesn’t stop, loss of appetite, stomach/abdominal pain, yellowing eyes/skin, dark urine.

      A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: fever, swollen lymph nodes, rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

      This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

      In the US – Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch.

      In Canada – Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

      Precautions

      See also Warning section.

      Before taking diclofenac, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or to aspirin or other NSAIDs (such as ibuprofen, naproxen, celecoxib); or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

      Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: asthma (including a history of worsening breathing after taking aspirin or other NSAIDs), blood disorders (such as anemia, bleeding/clotting problems), growths in the nose (nasal polyps), heart disease (such as previous heart attack), high blood pressure, liver disease, stroke, swelling (edema, fluid retention), stomach/intestinal/esophagus problems (such as bleeding, heartburn, ulcers).

      Kidney problems can sometimes occur with the use of NSAID medications, including diclofenac. Problems are more likely to occur if you are dehydrated, have heart failure or kidney disease, are an older adult, or if you take certain medications (see also Drug Interactions section). Drink plenty of fluids as directed by your doctor to prevent dehydration and tell your doctor right away if you have pink/bloody urine or any unusual change in the amount of urine.

      This drug may make you dizzy or drowsy or cause blurred vision. Alcohol or marijuana (cannabis) can worsen these effects. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs alertness or clear vision until you can do it safely. Limit alcoholic beverages. Talk to your doctor if you are using marijuana (cannabis).

      This medicine may cause stomach bleeding. Daily use of alcohol and tobacco, especially when combined with this medicine, may increase your risk for stomach bleeding. Limit alcohol and stop smoking.

      This medication may make you more sensitive to the sun. Limit your time in the sun. Avoid tanning booths and sunlamps. Use sunscreen and wear protective clothing when outdoors. Tell your doctor right away if you get sunburned or have skin blisters/redness.

      Before having surgery, tell your doctor or dentist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products).

      Older adults may be at greater risk for stomach/intestinal bleeding, kidney problems, heart attack, and stroke while using this drug.

      Before using this medication, women of childbearing age should talk with their doctor(s) about the benefits and risks. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or if you plan to become pregnant. This medication may harm an unborn baby and cause problems with normal labor/delivery. It is not recommended for use in pregnancy from 20 weeks until delivery. If your doctor decides that you need to use this medication between 20 and 30 weeks of pregnancy, you should use the lowest effective dose for the shortest possible time. You should not use this medication after 30 weeks of pregnancy.

      This medication passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

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        Immunisations. At Tuggeranong Square children's immunisation is regarded an important part of your childs health care. Our doctors take immunising children very seriously. and to ensure all children are immunised Tuggeranong Square Medical Practice doctors BULK BILL for all childhood immunisations. Tuggeranong Square Medical Practice also ensures the Practice Nursing Staff are highly trained in childhood immunisations.


        Women's Health

        Women's HealthOur practice is dedicated to treating a wide spectrum of women’s health concerns. We offer pre-natal, antenatal and postnatal care, contraceptive options, pap screening, and preventative health care advice. We provide assistance, advice and support through all stages of life, recognising the many issues many women may face from adolescence through to the peri and post-menopausal period.

        • Cervical Screening tests;
        • Reproductive health. Including Mirena and Implanon insertion;
        • Shared antenatal care.

        Men's Health

        Men's HealthWe encourage men to present routinely to their GP to discuss all aspects of their health. We provide comprehensive advice and support for men to address the prevention and management of various health conditions. This may include assessments for cardiovascular risk, diabetes, cancer prevention, mental health assessments, STD screening, sports injuries and the importance of sleep as it relates to other areas of health.


        • Preventative Healthcare. Including cardiovascular screening, mental health and cancer checks;
        • Prostate examination.
Alex Koliada, PhD

Alex Koliada, PhD

Alex Koliada, PhD, is a well-known doctor. He is famous for his studies of ageing, genetics and other medical conditions. He works at the Institute of Food Biotechnology and Genomics NAS of Ukraine. His scientific researches are printed by the most reputable international magazines. Some of his works are: Differences in the gut Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio across age groups in healthy Ukrainian population [BiomedCentral.com]; Mating status affects Drosophila lifespan, metabolism and antioxidant system [Science Direct]; Anise Hyssop Agastache foeniculum Increases Lifespan, Stress Resistance, and Metabolism by Affecting Free Radical Processes in Drosophila [Frontiersin].
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