How Long Does It Take To Detox From Alcohol

In fact, an estimated one-third of people who receive treatment for alcohol issues are sober one year later, according to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism .

How Long Does It Take to Detox from Alcohol?

Many people stop experiencing alcohol withdrawal symptoms four to five days after their last drink. Symptoms tend to be at their worst around the third day.

If you make the decision to stop drinking daily and heavily, you will likely experience withdrawal symptoms. The time it takes to detox depends on a few factors, including how much you drink, how long you’ve been drinking, and whether you’ve experienced alcohol withdrawal before.

Most people stop having withdrawal symptoms four to five days after their last drink.

Read on to learn more about what time frame to expect when detoxing from alcohol.

Alcohol depresses the central nervous system. This causes feelings of relaxation and euphoria. Because the body usually works to maintain balance, it will signal the brain to make more neurotransmitter receptors that excite or stimulate the central nervous system.

When you stop drinking, you take away alcohol not only from the receptors you originally had but also from the additional receptors your body made. As a result, your nervous system is overactive. This causes symptoms such as:

  • anxiety
  • irritability
  • nausea
  • rapid heart rate
  • sweating
  • tremors

In severe instances, you may experience delirium tremens (DTs) or alcohol withdrawal delirium. Symptoms doctors associate with DTs include:

  • hallucinations
  • high body temperature
  • illusions
  • paranoia
  • seizures

These are the most severe symptoms of alcohol withdrawal.

To assess a person’s withdrawal symptoms and recommend treatments, doctors often use a scale called the Clinical Institute for Withdrawal Assessment for Alcohol. The higher the number, the worse a person’s symptoms are and the more treatments they likely need.

You may not need any medications for alcohol withdrawal. You can still pursue therapy and support groups as you go through withdrawal.

You may need medications if you have moderate to severe withdrawal symptoms. Examples of these include:

  • Benzodiazepines. Doctors prescribe these medicines to reduce the likelihood of seizures during alcohol withdrawal. Examples include diazepam (Valium), alprazolam (Xanax), and lorazepam (Ativan). Doctors often choose these drugs to treat alcohol withdrawal.
  • Neuroleptic medications. These medications can help depress nervous system activity and may be helpful in preventing seizures and agitation associated with alcohol withdrawal.
  • Nutritional support. Doctors may administer nutrients such as folic acid, thiamine, and magnesium to reduce withdrawal symptoms and to correct nutrient deficiencies caused by alcohol use.
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Doctors may prescribe other medications to treat withdrawal-related symptoms. One example is a beta-blocker (such as propranolol) to reduce high blood pressure.

Once the immediate withdrawal symptoms have passed, a doctor may prescribe medicines to reduce the likelihood that a person will start drinking again. Examples that are FDA-approved include:

  • naltrexone (ReVia). Naltrexone can reduce alcohol cravings and help a person maintain their abstinence from alcohol by blocking opioid (feel-good) receptors in their body.
  • disulfiram (Antabuse). This medication can reduce alcohol cravings and makes a person feel very ill if they drink while taking it.

A doctor may discuss these and other medicines with you. You can choose to use these along with therapy and support groups to help you maintain your sobriety.

According to a study , the following are general guidelines about when you can expect to experience alcohol withdrawal symptoms:

6 hours

Minor withdrawal symptoms usually begin about six hours after your last drink. A person who has a long history of heavy drinking could have a seizure six hours after stopping drinking.

12 to 24 hours

A small percentage of people going through alcohol withdrawal have hallucinations at this point. They may hear or see things that aren’t there.

24 to 48 hours

Minor withdrawal symptoms usually continue during this time. These symptoms may include headache, tremors, and stomach upset. If a person goes through only minor withdrawal, their symptoms usually peak at 18 to 24 hours and start to decrease after four to five days.

48 hours to 72 hours

Some people experience a severe form of alcohol withdrawal known as DTs. A person with this condition can have a very high heart rate, seizures, or a high body temperature.

72 hours

This is the time when alcohol withdrawal symptoms are usually at their worst. In rare cases, moderate withdrawal symptoms can last for a month. These include rapid heart rate and illusions (seeing things that aren’t there).

According to a 2015 article, an estimated 50 percent of people with an alcohol use disorder go through withdrawal symptoms when they stop drinking. Doctors estimate that 3 to 5 percent of people will have severe symptoms.

Multiple factors can affect how long it may take you to withdraw from alcohol. A doctor will consider all these factors when estimating how long-lasting and how severe your symptoms may be.

Risk factors for DTs include:

  • abnormal liver function
  • history of DTs
  • history of seizures with alcohol withdrawals
  • low platelet counts
  • low potassium levels
  • low sodium levels
  • older age at the time of withdrawal
  • preexisting dehydration
  • presence of brain lesions
  • use of other drugs
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If you have any of these risk factors, it’s important that you withdraw from alcohol at a medical facility that’s equipped to prevent and treat alcohol-related complications.

If your drinking makes you feel out of control and you are ready to seek help, many organizations can assist you.

  • This helpline provides around-the-clock support for individuals and their family members struggling with substance abuse.
  • Helpline operators can help you find a treatment facility, therapist, support group, or other resources to stop drinking.

The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism also offers an Alcohol Treatment Navigator tool that can help you find the right treatments for you that are close to home.

Other online resources that offer well-researched information and support include:

  • Alcoholics Anonymous
  • National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence
  • National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Your primary care provider can advise you on where to seek care for the physical and mental symptoms of alcohol withdrawal. It’s very important to seek help if you struggle with alcohol use disorder. It is possible to get treatment and live a healthier life with a better relationship with alcohol.

In fact, an estimated one-third of people who receive treatment for alcohol issues are sober one year later, according to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism .

In addition to the sober individuals, many people among the remaining two-thirds are also drinking less and experiencing fewer alcohol-related health problems after one year.

If you are concerned about potential alcohol withdrawal symptoms, talk to your doctor. A doctor can evaluate your overall health and alcohol abuse history to help you determine how likely it is that you’ll experience symptoms.

Last medically reviewed on July 6, 2022

How we reviewed this article:

Healthline has strict sourcing guidelines and relies on peer-reviewed studies, academic research institutions, and medical associations. We avoid using tertiary references. You can learn more about how we ensure our content is accurate and current by reading our editorial policy.

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Our experts continually monitor the health and wellness space, and we update our articles when new information becomes available.

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Alex Koliada, PhD

Alex Koliada, PhD

Alex Koliada, PhD, is a well-known doctor. He is famous for his studies of ageing, genetics and other medical conditions. He works at the Institute of Food Biotechnology and Genomics NAS of Ukraine. His scientific researches are printed by the most reputable international magazines. Some of his works are: Differences in the gut Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio across age groups in healthy Ukrainian population [BiomedCentral.com]; Mating status affects Drosophila lifespan, metabolism and antioxidant system [Science Direct]; Anise Hyssop Agastache foeniculum Increases Lifespan, Stress Resistance, and Metabolism by Affecting Free Radical Processes in Drosophila [Frontiersin].
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