Methylprednisolone 4 Mg Dosepk

Senior dosage (ages 65 years and older)

Methylprednisolone, oral tablet

Methylprednisolone oral tablet is a prescription drug that’s available as the brand-name drug Medrol. It’s also available as a generic drug.

Generic drugs usually cost less than the brand-name version. In some cases, the brand-name drug and the generic version may be available in different forms and strengths.

Methylprednisolone also comes as a suspension or solution. Those forms are given to you by a healthcare provider.

Why it’s used

This drug is used to treat many conditions. It helps to control inflammation and to modify your body’s immune response. The conditions it’s used to treat include:

  • endocrine disorders such as primary or secondary adrenocortical insufficiency
  • rheumatic disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis or psoriatic arthritis
  • collagen diseases such as lupus or systemic dermatomyositis
  • skin diseases such as psoriasis or Stevens-Johnson syndrome
  • severe allergies that haven’t been controlled with other treatment, such as seasonal or year-round allergies or allergic reactions to medications
  • eye problems such as swelling or ulcers (sores) in your eye
  • stomach or intestinal problems such as ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease
  • respiratory problems such as lung damage caused by beryllium poisoning, or by Loeffler’s syndrome that’s not controlled by other treatments
  • blood disorders such as low levels of platelets in adults, or lack of red blood cells in children
  • neoplastic diseases such as blood cancer or cancer in the lymphatic system in adults
  • multiple sclerosis flare-ups
  • infections, such as trichinosis with brain or heart problems

How it works

Methylprednisolone belongs to a class of drugs called glucocorticoids. A class of drugs is a group of medications that work in a similar way. These drugs are often used to treat similar conditions.

Methylprednisolone works by decreasing inflammation and changing your body’s immune response. This reduces the inflammation caused by your condition.

Methylprednisolone oral tablet doesn’t cause drowsiness, but it can cause other side effects.

More common side effects

The more common side effects of methylprednisolone can include:

  • headache
  • nausea and vomiting
  • weight gain
  • confusion, excitement, and restlessness
  • swelling of your ankles, feet, or hands
  • skin problems, such as acne, thin skin, and shiny skin
  • increased thirst
  • infection
  • high blood pressure
  • muscle weakness
  • depression

If these effects are mild, they may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. If they’re more severe or don’t go away, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

Serious side effects

Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 if your symptoms feel life-threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency. Serious side effects and their symptoms can include the following:

  • Allergic reactions. Symptoms may include:
    • skin rash
    • itching or hives
    • swelling of your face, lips, or tongue
    • depression
    • anxiety
    • intense excitement or happiness
    • personality changes
    • psychosis
    • changes in your vision
    • eye pain
    • bulging eyes
    • increased thirst
    • urinating more often than normal
    • fever
    • sore throat
    • sneezing
    • coughing
    • weakness
    • irregular heart rhythm
    • loss of appetite
    • lack of energy
    • nausea
    • vomiting
    • headache
    • fever
    • joint or muscle pain
    • skin irritation
    • weight loss
    • low blood pressure (may make you feel dizzy or faint)

    Disclaimer: Our goal is to provide you with the most relevant and current information. However, because drugs affect each person differently, we cannot guarantee that this information includes all possible side effects. This information is not a substitute for medical advice. Always discuss possible side effects with a healthcare provider who knows your medical history.

    Methylprednisolone oral tablet can interact with other medications, vitamins, or herbs you may be taking. An interaction is when a substance changes the way a drug works. This can be harmful or prevent the drug from working well.

    To help avoid interactions, your doctor should manage all of your medications carefully. Be sure to tell your doctor about all medications, vitamins, or herbs you’re taking. To find out how this drug might interact with something else you’re taking, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

    Drugs you should not use with methylprednisolone

    Do not take these drugs with methylprednisolone. When used with methylprednisolone, these drugs can cause dangerous effects in the body. Examples of these drugs include:

    • Live vaccines, such as the nasal flu vaccine, varicella (chickenpox) vaccine, and measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine: Don’t receive a live vaccine while taking this drug. A live vaccine is a weakened version of a disease. The vaccine won’t fully protect you from disease while you’re taking methylprednisolone.

    Interactions that increase the risk of side effects from methylprednisolone

    Taking methylprednisolone with certain medications raises your risk of side effects from methylprednisolone. This is because the amount of methylprednisolone in your body is increased. Examples of these drugs include:

    • Cyclosporine: These drugs can each cause each other to build up in your body. If you use these drugs together, you may experience side effects such as seizures.
    • Ketoconazole: Your doctor may adjust your dosage of methylprednisolone if you take ketoconazole. Your doctor may do this to avoid increased side effects from methylprednisolone.

    Interactions that increase the risk of side effects from other drugs

    Taking methylprednisolone with certain medications raises your risk of side effects from these drugs. Examples of these drugs include:

    • Aspirin: Your chance of side effects from aspirin increases when you stop taking methylprednisolone. If you have a blood clotting problem, ask your doctor if methylprednisolone is safe for you.
    • Warfarin and heparin: When used with methylprednisolone, these drugs can make your blood too thin and cause dangerous bleeding. Or they might not work as well to thin your blood. Your doctor should monitor you closely if you take either of these drugs with methylprednisolone.

    Interactions that can make your drugs less effective

    When methylprednisolone is used with certain drugs, it may not work as well to treat your condition. This is because the amount of methylprednisolone in your body may be decreased. Examples of these drugs include:

    • Phenobarbital, phenytoin, and rifampin: Your doctor may increase your dosage of methylprednisolone if you take any of these drugs.

    Disclaimer: Our goal is to provide you with the most relevant and current information. However, because drugs interact differently in each person, we cannot guarantee that this information includes all possible interactions. This information is not a substitute for medical advice. Always speak with your healthcare provider about possible interactions with all prescription drugs, vitamins, herbs and supplements, and over-the-counter drugs that you are taking.

    This dosage information is for methylprednisolone oral tablet. All possible dosages and forms may not be included here. Your dosage, form, and how often you take it will depend on:

    • your age
    • the condition being treated
    • how severe your condition is
    • other medical conditions you have
    • how you react to the first dose

    Forms and strengths

    Generic: Methylprednisolone

    Brand: Medrol

    • Form: oral tablet
    • Strengths: 2 mg, 4 mg, 8 mg, 16 mg, 32 mg

    Dosage for multiple sclerosis

    Adult dosage (ages 18–64 years)

    • Typical starting dosage: 160 mg per day taken in one or two doses.
    • Dosage changes: After taking 160 mg per day for 1 week, your doctor will reduce your dosage to 64 mg taken every other day for one month.

    Child dosage (ages 0–17 years)

    Your child’s doctor will decide your child’s dosage based on the condition being treated. They should give your child the lowest effective dosage.

    Senior dosage (ages 65 years and older)

    The kidneys of older adults may not work as well as they used to. This can cause your body to process drugs more slowly. As a result, more of a drug stays in your body for a longer time. This raises your risk of side effects.

    Your doctor may start you on a lowered dose or a different dosing schedule. This can help keep levels of this drug from building up too much in your body.

    Dosage for all other treated conditions

    Adult dosage (ages 18–64 years)

    • Typical starting dosage: 4–48 mg per day taken in one or two doses.
    • Dosage changes: If you respond well to the drug, your doctor may decrease your dosage slowly until you reach the lowest possible effective dosage.
    • Alternate day therapy: If you’re going to be on this drug for a long time, your doctor may have you take it every other day. This may reduce side effects.

    Child dosage (ages 0–17 years)

    Your child’s doctor will decide your child’s dosage based on the condition being treated. They should give your child the lowest effective dosage.

    Senior dosage (ages 65 years and older)

    The kidneys of older adults may not work as well as they used to. This can cause your body to process drugs more slowly. As a result, more of a drug stays in your body for a longer time. This raises your risk of side effects.

    Your doctor may start you on a lowered dose or a different dosing schedule. This can help keep levels of this drug from building up too much in your body.

    Disclaimer: Our goal is to provide you with the most relevant and current information. However, because drugs affect each person differently, we cannot guarantee that this list includes all possible dosages. This information is not a substitute for medical advice. Always speak with your doctor or pharmacist about dosages that are right for you.

    Methylprednisolone oral tablet comes with several warnings.

    Hormone changes warning

    This drug may cause hormone changes. It can cause your body to stop making hormones on its own. If you respond well to your dosage of this drug, your doctor may slowly reduce your dosage to reduce your risk of side effects.

    Weakened immune system warning

    This drug can weaken your immune system. This makes it easier for you to get infections and harder for you to fight infections. While you take this drug, you should stay away from people who are sick or who have recently been sick. This includes people who have chickenpox, measles, or the flu.

    Tell your doctor if you’ve had any recent infections or if you have symptoms of an infection. These include fever, chills, or body aches.

    Vaccines warning

    People who receive the smallpox vaccine while taking this drug have a higher risk of serious side effects. You should wait three months after your last dose of methylprednisolone before you receive the smallpox vaccine.

    Tell your doctor that you’re taking this drug before getting any vaccines, especially live vaccines.

    Allergy warning

    Methylprednisolone can cause a severe allergic reaction. Symptoms can include:

    • itching
    • hives
    • trouble breathing
    • swelling of your throat or tongue

    If you have an allergic reaction, call your doctor or local poison control center right away. If your symptoms are severe, call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room.

    Food interactions warning

    You shouldn’t eat grapefruit or drink grapefruit juice during your treatment with this drug. Doing so can increase the levels of methylprednisolone in your blood. This raises your risk of side effects.

    Warnings for people with certain health conditions

    For people with heart disease: This drug can increase your blood pressure. It can also cause your body to retain salt and water. Tell your doctor about your history of heart disease.

    For people with diabetes: This drug may affect your body’s ability to control your blood sugar level. You might need to test your blood sugar level more often. Tell your doctor about your history of diabetes.

    For people with ulcers: This drug may cause stomach bleeding. Tell your doctor if you have an ulcer or have had an ulcer in the past.

    For people with glaucoma: This drug can increase the pressure in your eyes if you take it for a long time. Tell your doctor if you have glaucoma or any other eye-related illness before you start taking this drug.

    For people with infections: This drug may make it harder for your body to fight off your infection. Ask your doctor if this drug is safe for you.

    For people with liver problems: If you have cirrhosis, you may not be able to process this drug as well. This may increase the levels of methylprednisolone in your body and cause more side effects. Your doctor may start you on a lower dosage depending on your liver function.

    For people with hypothyroidism: You have a higher risk of side effects from this drug. Tell your doctor about your history of thyroid disease. You may need a lower dosage of this drug.

    For people with herpes of the eye: Ask your doctor if this drug is safe for you. You may have a higher risk of side effects.

    For people with systemic sclerosis: Corticosteroids, including this drug, increase your risk of scleroderma renal crisis. Key symptoms of this condition include kidney failure and increased blood pressure. Your doctor will monitor you carefully if you have systemic sclerosis and you take methylprednisolone.

    Warnings for other groups

    For pregnant women: There haven’t been enough studies done in humans to be certain how methylprednisolone might affect a pregnancy. Talk to your doctor if you’re pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Methylprednisolone should only be used during pregnancy if the benefits outweigh potential risks to the pregnancy.

    Call your doctor right away if you become pregnant while taking this drug.

    For women who are breastfeeding: Methylprednisolone may pass into breast milk and cause side effects in a child who is breastfed. Talk to your doctor if you breastfeed your child. You may need to decide whether to stop breastfeeding or to stop taking this medication.

    For seniors: The kidneys of older adults may not work as well as they used to. This can cause your body to process drugs more slowly. As a result, more of a drug stays in your body for a longer time. This raises your risk of side effects. If you’re a senior, you may need a lower dosage or you may need a different dosing schedule.

    For children: This drug may slow your child’s growth. Your child’s doctor should monitor your child’s height and growth regularly. Children should use the lowest effective dosage of this drug to decrease the risks of slowed growth.

    Methylprednisolone – Uses, Side Effects, and More

    Methylprednisolone is used to treat conditions such as arthritis, blood disorders, severe allergic reactions, certain cancers, eye conditions, skin/kidney/intestinal/lung diseases, and immune system disorders. It decreases your immune system’s response to various diseases to reduce symptoms such as swelling, pain, and allergic-type reactions. This medication is a corticosteroid hormone.Methylprednisolone may also be used with other medications in hormone disorders.

    How to use Methylprednisolone

    Take this medication by mouth as directed by your doctor, usually with food or milk. Follow your dosing instructions carefully. The dosage and length of treatment are based on your medical condition and response to treatment. Different dosing schedules exist for this medication. If you are not taking the same dose each day or if you take this medication every other day, it may help to mark your calendar with a reminder. Consult your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.

    Do not increase your dose or use this drug more often or for longer than prescribed. Your condition will not improve any faster, and your risk of side effects will increase.

    Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor. Some conditions may become worse when this drug is suddenly stopped. Your dose may need to be gradually decreased.

    If you suddenly stop using this medication, you may have withdrawal symptoms (such as weakness, weight loss, nausea, muscle pain, headache, tiredness, dizziness). To help prevent withdrawal, your doctor may lower your dose slowly. Withdrawal is more likely if you have used methylprednisolone for a long time or in high doses. Tell your doctor or pharmacist right away if you have withdrawal. See also Precautions section.

    Tell your doctor if your condition does not improve or if it worsens.

    Side Effects

    Nausea, vomiting, heartburn, headache, dizziness, trouble sleeping, appetite changes, increased sweating, or acne may occur. If any of these effects last or get worse, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

    Remember that this medication has been prescribed because your doctor has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

    This medication may make your blood sugar rise, which can cause or worsen diabetes. Tell your doctor right away if you have symptoms of high blood sugar such as increased thirst/urination. If you already have diabetes, check your blood sugar regularly as directed and share the results with your doctor. Your doctor may need to adjust your diabetes medication, exercise program, or diet.

    This medication may lower your ability to fight infections. This may make you more likely to get a serious (rarely fatal) infection or make any infection you have worse. Tell your doctor right away if you have any signs of infection (such as sore throat that doesn’t go away, fever, chills, cough, white patches in the mouth).

    Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: unusual weight gain, menstrual period changes, bone/joint pain, easy bruising/bleeding, mental/mood changes (such as mood swings, depression, agitation), muscle weakness/pain, puffy face, slow wound healing, swelling of the ankles/feet/hands, thinning skin, unusual hair/skin growth, vision problems, fast/slow/irregular heartbeat, symptoms of stomach/intestinal bleeding (such as stomach/abdominal pain, black/tarry stools, vomit that looks like coffee grounds).

    Get medical help right away if you have any very serious side effects, including: seizures.

    A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

    This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

    In the US – Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch.

    In Canada – Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

    Precautions

    Before taking methylprednisolone, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or to prednisone; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

    Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: bleeding problems, blood clots, brittle bones (osteoporosis), diabetes, eye diseases (such as cataracts, glaucoma, herpes infection of the eye), heart problems (such as recent heart attack, congestive heart failure), high blood pressure, current/past infections (such as those caused by tuberculosis, threadworm, herpes, fungus), kidney disease, liver disease, mental/mood conditions (such as psychosis, depression, anxiety), stomach/intestinal problems (such as diverticulitis, ulcer, ulcerative colitis), seizures.

    This drug may make you dizzy. Alcohol or marijuana (cannabis) can make you more dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs alertness until you can do it safely. Talk to your doctor if you are using marijuana (cannabis).

    This medicine may cause stomach bleeding. Daily use of alcohol while using this medicine may increase your risk for stomach bleeding. Limit alcoholic beverages. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

    Methylprednisolone can make you more likely to get infections or may worsen any current infections. Avoid contact with people who have infections that may spread to others (such as chickenpox, measles, flu). Consult your doctor if you have been exposed to an infection or for more details.

    Tell your health care professional that you are using methylprednisolone before having any immunizations, vaccinations, or skin tests. Avoid contact with people who have recently received live vaccines (such as flu vaccine inhaled through the nose).

    Before having surgery, tell your doctor or dentist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products).

    Using corticosteroid medications for a long time can make it more difficult for your body to respond to physical stress. Before having surgery or emergency treatment, or if you get a serious illness/injury, tell your doctor or dentist that you are using this medication or have used this medication within the past 12 months. Tell your doctor right away if you develop unusual/extreme tiredness or weight loss. If you will be using this medication for a long time, carry a warning card or medical ID bracelet that identifies your use of this medication. See also Medical Alert section.

    Older adults may be more sensitive to the side effects of this drug, especially bone loss/pain, stomach/intestinal bleeding, and mental/mood changes (such as confusion).

    This medication may slow down a child’s growth if used for a long time. Consult the doctor or pharmacist for more details. See the doctor regularly so your child’s height and growth can be checked.

    During pregnancy, this medication should be used only when clearly needed. It may rarely harm an unborn baby. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. Infants born to mothers who have been using this medication for a long time may have hormone problems. Tell your doctor right away if you notice symptoms such as nausea/vomiting that doesn’t stop, severe diarrhea, or weakness in your newborn.

    This medication passes into breast milk, but is unlikely to harm a nursing infant. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

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Alex Koliada, PhD

Alex Koliada, PhD

Alex Koliada, PhD, is a well-known doctor. He is famous for his studies of ageing, genetics and other medical conditions. He works at the Institute of Food Biotechnology and Genomics NAS of Ukraine. His scientific researches are printed by the most reputable international magazines. Some of his works are: Differences in the gut Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio across age groups in healthy Ukrainian population [BiomedCentral.com]; Mating status affects Drosophila lifespan, metabolism and antioxidant system [Science Direct]; Anise Hyssop Agastache foeniculum Increases Lifespan, Stress Resistance, and Metabolism by Affecting Free Radical Processes in Drosophila [Frontiersin].
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